All Good Things

So the year ended and I went home. I was amazed and surprised and delighted and wow’d  – all at the same time – when two months later at the School of Optometry in Johannesburg the 1974 Apache High School Annual arrived in the post with this in it:

ApacheYearbook74 (1)

Page 2:

ApacheYearbook74 (2)

Blown away! Thank you!!

 

 

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Dottie Moffett

RedRiver NewMexico 1973 Dottie
Dottie Moffett, Red River, New Mexico 1973

As a sad postscript to my reminiscing about this wonderful year, I found out way after the fact that Dottie Moffett Butler died unexpectedly at her home in San Diego, California, on Wednesday, July 5, 2006.

I also learnt that Dottie was born July 8, 1955, in Daytona Beach. At the age of seven her family moved to Chickasha and then, several years later, moved to Ardmore. Dottie graduated from Ardmore High School.

During her junior year she was a Rotary Exchange student to South Africa. I met her after that when she was back in OK in 1973. She returned to South Africa to earn her bachelor’s degree from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, where we met up once when I traveled to Cape Town in my mother’s borrowed car as a student in Johannesburg.

I found out she had gone on to earn her master’s degree in psychology from East Central University in Ada. Her obituary read: As a psychologist, Dottie was a compassionate and caring counselor whose gift for helping others through difficult times will long be remembered. Dottie is survived by her husband, Dr. Harrison Butler, San Diego; her mother, Dorothy Moffett McCall, Durham N.C.; her sister, Dale Moffett, Cary, N.C.; two brothers, David Moffett and his wife Mary, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Denny Moffett and his wife Mary, Tulsa, Oklahoma, as well as several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her father, Dr. J. Denny Moffett Jr. (I see her mother Dorothy McCall passed away more recently in 2014, aged 88 in Durham N.C).

Remembrance services for Dottie were held in San Diego and on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, where Dottie and family had vacationed. (This information was provided by Haigh-Black Funeral Home).


Devastated. Too soon! Dottie was a very special lady. I knew her only for a couple years, in Oklahoma, in Cape Town, and on a trip through Canada with her twin sister Dale and her very good friend Sherry Porter, but she was unforgettable – her heart, her sincerity, her joie de vivre, and that wonderful laugh!

RedRiver NewMexico 1973 (10).JPG
Dottie with Jim Patterson of Apache OK in the Sangre de Christo mountains NM 1973

Dottie in Montreal 1973

Dottie in Montreal (I think - Ottawa?)

(PS: Dottie’s Dad, Dr Denny Moffett sent me a book on the Wichita Mountains and the Native American people. I must find it).

My Olympus Trip Camera

My camera in America in 1973 was an Olympus Trip 35. I really enjoyed it. Now – decades later – I went finding out about it from UK and USA websites written by old camera enthusiasts.And hey! It seems it was a winner!

UK – For anyone who wants to take well exposed, sharp pictures with a fixed focus lens, I would recommend the trusty old Olympus Trip 35, metal bodied with a multi-coated Zuiko lens promoted so successfully by David Bailey in the ’70s – a camera capable of producing pictures indistinguishable from those taken with a top professional 35mm camera. We’ve had ours since 1978 and it’s still working perfectly.

The good news is that you can still buy one secondhand in near perfect condition from most photography shops for around £30 and you won’t be disappointed.

The focus ring is marked with symbols on the top of the ring – a head and shoulders to indicate 1 metre, two figures to indicate 1.5 metres, three figures to indicate 3 metres and mountain peaks to indicate infinity.

USA – The Olympus Trip 35 is a fully automatic exposure 35mm film camera introduced in 1968. Olympus made over 10,000,000 of them through 1988. It’s an inexpensive, lightweight camera with few adjustments. I bought mine at a thrift shop for $5 in 2007 with a dented filter ring. The date code says it was made in 1974.

The Olympus Trip 35 has an internal Galvanometer and selenium cell. It operates completely without batteries. Its light meter and programmed automatic exposure system are solar powered!

Perfect!